Category Archives: Good Health

Still Man’s Best Friend – Especially for Baby Boomers

Man's Best Friend

Now that you are an empty nester, what would you do without Gimley, your ‘fur baby’  –  man’s best friend?

You may even be living alone, trying to figure out what comes next and Gimley keeps you sane.

You are one of the 76 million Baby Boom Generation, born between 1944 and 1964 – a generation that loves dogs.

Dogs have been called ‘man’s best friend’ since they were first domesticated, thousands of years ago. But, Baby Boomers seem to have taken it to heart more than other generations.

They make up 37% of all dog owners – a sizeable chunk of the dog-owning population.

If you are a ‘boomer’ or are related to a ‘boomer, you know their dogs  are more than just a friend to keep them company as the years pile up and retirement is looming. They are part of the family.

Why Boomers Relate Differently to Dogs

Baby Boomers were welcomed into a world that was enjoying a new level of comfort. Life was different and possibilities unknown to prior generations were everywhere. This included dog companionship on a different level.

They grew up with their dogs in the home and developed strong bonds with their furry friends at an early age. The connection to pets was intense and those relationships were carried into adulthood.  

The Shift from Outside to Inside

Before the Baby Boomers, dogs were primarily outside pets. You may remember the backyard dog houses. But with the Boomer Generation things changed.

Pups were kept inside and integrated into the family, which created a companionship dynamic that had never before existed.

The strong bond Boomers have with their dogs goes a long way in keeping them feeling fulfilled and sociable.

Coping with Change

The companionship and unconditional love that dogs provide helps owners adjust more easily to life changes.

  1. The empty nest – filling the gap when children leave.
  2. Physical well-being (staying active) – dogs must be walked, so owners get more exercise.
  3. Mental health – there are issues that can arise as a person moves into different stages of life. The loving companionship of a dog reduces loneliness and lessens the risk of depression and anxiety

Dogs Are Social Facilitators

Boomers know that dog owners reap social benefits that do not come with other types of pets.

Dogs love to be outside, they love to run and play, and they have to be “walked” for exercise and relief. The result is dog owners tend to get out of the house several times a day and enjoy the side benefit of easily connecting with other dog owners.

A few activities that Boomers enjoy with their furry best friends:

  • Getting to know the neighborhood and the neighbors
  • Being part of a dog-walking group
  • Attending dog-focused events
  • Regular visits to the dog park

Dogs Are Good for the Heart

When it comes to heart health issues, dogs have your back. According to a nationwide study, dog owners have a lower risk of heart disease.

The researchers also found there is a link between the breed and the relative risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Hunting breeds were related to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease than any other breed of dog.

So, if you are in the market for a dog, you may want to consider a Labrador, beagle, Weimaraner, golden retriever, or bloodhound.

And . . . That’s Not all

There are many health benefits of living with man’s best friend.

The companionship and higher levels of exercise that come with having a furry friend lowers the risk of high blood pressure.

It is hard to stay stressed when you feel the unconditional love that dogs provide. Studies have found that the simple scratching of your dog’s head can improve your mood significantly.

To sum it up – dogs are still man’s best friend, just ask any Boomer dog-owner.   

Related Article: High Stress Slows Down Your Brain

The article was adapted with permission from the original published on FOMO Bones.

Are You at Risk for Diabetes?

Diabetes Testing
Free photo 82963377 © creativecommonsstockphotos – Dreamstime.com

You haven’t been feeling very well the last couple of days, and have had trouble concentrating.

You’re always thirsty and constantly running to the restroom.

And . . . the headaches are driving you crazy.

What’s Going On? 

The quick answer is that it may be high blood sugar. But before you panic, ask yourself some questions about the last few days. 

  • Are you under an excessive amount of stress?
  • Have you been eating a lot of unhealthy foods?
  • Did you stop exercising?
  • Have you eaten an excessively carb-heavy meal?

Any of these can lead to a blood sugar spike.

An occasional spike doesn’t mean that you are immediately at risk for poor health, but consistently high blood sugar is serious.

It is often related to Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes.

Two Types of Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes, known as juvenile or childhood diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin – and requires insulin injections.

Scientists think it is either genetic or caused by environmental factors like a virus that can trigger the disease.

Type 2 diabetes is more common and typically develops in older children and adults, but can occur at any age.

With this type, the individual’s body does not  respond to insulin as well as it should and in advanced stages, the body doesn’t make enough insulin.

Type 2 can often be controlled by diet and lifestyle changes.

Primary Risk Factor

The primary risk factor is obesity – which afflicts more than 1 in 3 people in the U.S.

 If you are extremely overweight and have been for a while, you should have your blood sugar levels checked regularly. Once diabetes develops, other health issues with the heart, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels can appear.

In 2017 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that more than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes,

Medical News Today recently reported that 9% of the U.S. population have diabetes and it is the 7th leading cause of death.

Even if you are not diagnosed with diabetes, having higher-than-recommended blood sugar levels can be dangerous and indicate a condition known as “pre-diabetes.” An additional 38% of the population has been diagnosed with this condition.

What Is Blood Sugar?

The terms “sugar” and “glucose” are used interchangeably, but they are slightly different. When sugar is consumed it is converted to glucose (blood sugar) as a fuel source for the body. 

The brain prefers to burn glucose for energy, which means it is reliant on carbohydrates. But, the rest of the body can also burn fat for fuel in between carb-rich meals. Glucose storage is low in comparison to fat storage in the body.

If you do not eat enough carbs, small amounts of glucose can also be made through non-carbohydrate food sources. The body can also slowly learn to make ketones from fat, which can be supplementary brain food, if necessary.

Glucose Levels Must Be Controlled

Glucose powers the body, but uncontrolled levels can be dangerous.

Diabetes is uncontrolled high blood sugar (glucose) levels.

When you are healthy, blood glucose levels are controlled by the secretion of insulin from the pancreas. Insulin is a regulator that lowers blood glucose levels, as needed.

When certain foods cause blood sugar levels to rise, insulin is secreted from the pancreas to normalize the levels and all is well.

With Type 2 diabetes, the cells don’t respond correctly to insulin and high levels of blood sugar occur which is called hyperglycemia.

Impact of Weight Gain and Weight Loss

A definite link has not been established between weight gain and increased blood glucose. However, one study showed weight gain increased the risk of diabetes.

Studies have also shown that weight loss can have major beneficial effects over time. Every kg of body weight lost annually was associated with a 33% lower risk of diabetes.

Even modest weight gain can have a substantial impact on the risk of diabetes.

Careful monitoring and maintenance of weight are important for overall health. This is particularly important if diabetes runs in your family or if you have been diagnosed with “pre-diabetes.”

Are You at Risk?

It is important to listen your body – to pay attention to how you feel. Headaches, feeling thirsty frequently and have to pee a lot are indicators of potential problems and should be discussed with your doctor.

American Diabetes Association offers a quick Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. The link will take you to the site.

Your health is your most important asset. Take good care of it! A few simple steps to keep you are track and ensure a long, healthy life.

  • Eat a healthy diet, be sure your body is getting the nutrients it needs.
  • Avoid junk food/fast foods – the additives and sugar content are harmful to your mind and body. 
  • Exercise regularly – to keep everything working as it should.
  • Have a complete physical checkup every year.
Fruits and Vegetables
Image by by Erdosain

Eat Well – Stay Well – Live Well.

I know you can do it.  

Adapted with permission from an article originally published on HVMN by Ryan Rodal

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